You are here:
  1. Home
  2. Communities
  3. The City
  4. Q&A with Sue Millar

Q&A with Sue Millar

7 November 2017

Sue Millar is a partner at Stephenson Harwood.

Sue Millar

You're talking to a friend of a friend at a party. How do you describe what you do?

I tell them that I argue for a living and then try to remember that I am in a social setting and not litigating! Sad, but as my family will tell you, true.

What was your first job?

I was a sales assistant on the provisions counter of the local Fine Fare. My claim to fame (of which I was justly proud aged 16) was that I could cut exactly half a pound of English cheddar. We had a number of older customers who lived through the Second World War and the subsequent rationing and who remembered, rightly or wrongly, shop assistants' ability to cut ‘exact’ amounts.

Share some great advice you've been given.

It sounds trite but it has stood me in good stead: time spent thinking about drafting is never wasted. In this electronic world, we are all under pressure to start writing or respond immediately. It is invariably better to structure your content first!

What's in your desk drawers?

A mess of personal papers (including my will, I think or at least I hope!) and basic toiletries (tooth brush, toothpaste etc).

How do you relax?

I was very late to the party but I thoroughly recommend yoga. I practice at home using the 'Yoga with Adriene' app.

What's your pet hate?

I have two: misplaced apostrophes and the use of 'however' as a conjunctive!

Sum up working as a solicitor in one word.

Fascinating.

Favourite city apart from London?

Amsterdam – I love its culture, beauty and its grime. Much like London!

What book is on your bedside table ?

I have two: What Happened by Hillary Clinton and The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. No comment required!

What needs to happen to get more women into leadership roles?

To repeat my comments at the Law Society Excellence Awards, we need the support of 'feminist men'. We can't drag the unconvinced with us but they tend to follow obediently if encouraged by feminist men. It is not right but it is the quickest way to achieve lasting change.

If you hadn't become a solicitor, what would you have done?

Before I discovered the law, I had wanted to be an investigative journalist. I still think that would be fun, if not a bit scary - so not that different from law.

Recommended

Your career sign
WLD returners course

This course on 24-25 November helps returning solicitors, men and women, return to the profession after a career break.

WLD returners course > More